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  • 24th-November-2009
    6ame

    Re: On becoming a man

    What's 4 + 4?
    Here's my man Chris Rock with the answer.
    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xz1gCLXxxnc"]YouTube- Chris Rock's Message To Wannabe Single Mums[/ame]
  • 24th-November-2009
    Incognito

    Re: On becoming a man

    Quote Quote from flynvfae View Post
    so what can women do to help the fatherless?
    Women can make every effort to facilitate dad being an active part of the children's lives. She can encourage healthy male role models to be an active part of the children's lives if dad cannot or chooses not to be around.

    Men can be mentors.
  • 24th-November-2009
    RebelliousVanilla

    Re: On becoming a man

    Quote Quote from MikeT View Post
    Only a man can raise a boy to be a man.

    Can you imagine a woman teaching a young guy about how to shave thier face?

    When some women don't even understand thier own bodies/genitalia, they profess to know the male body.

    Ask a feminist these points, chances are you'll get either a blank stare or some sort of a loud verbal tirade about how women are mothers, therefore they know everything.
    I think a woman can raise a boy to be a man. But not the average woman and especially not a feminist. Just like a father can raise a daughter by himself with a lot more effort. The problem with single parent homes is that the parent has to do both roles, not more of the role they know. The sooner these idiots will learn that fathers are needed to have functioning children, the better. The state subsidizing single motherhood isn't a benefit either.
  • 24th-November-2009
    MikeT

    Re: On becoming a man

    Only a man can raise a boy to be a man.

    Can you imagine a woman teaching a young guy about how to shave thier face?

    When some women don't even understand thier own bodies/genitalia, they profess to know the male body.

    Ask a feminist these points, chances are you'll get either a blank stare or some sort of a loud verbal tirade about how women are mothers, therefore they know everything.
  • 24th-November-2009
    Zuberi

    Re: On becoming a man

    It takes a man to raise a boy to become a man!

    As for me, I am a man by my on definition AND NOT SOCIETY'S!!!!!!!!
  • 24th-November-2009
    flynvfae

    Re: On becoming a man

    Quote Quote from shaazam View Post
    and try and avoid signing the wimyns' peonage contract ( passed of as a marrige contract by the shelL trick feminit exponents of cunning conning and guile)
    so its better for men not to get married and have kids? i think that goes against the whole topic here... but correct me if i'm wrong
  • 24th-November-2009
    shaazam

    Re: On becoming a man

    one expedient boys might employ to surviving to manhood is to consider 100% of wimyns' studies publications as 200% baloney and try and avoid signing the wimyns' peonage contract ( passed of as a marrige contract by the shelL trick feminit exponents of cunning conning and guile)

    this would begin by using the pages of the Female Eunuch as third rate bum fodder
  • 24th-November-2009
    flynvfae

    Re: On becoming a man

    so what can women do to help the fatherless?
  • 24th-November-2009
    flynvfae

    Re: On becoming a man

    Quote Quote from fcb98292 View Post
    Single mothers do not have what it takes to raise a boy to be a man. Their instruction is full of how not to be a man, and devoid of the only real-life example that boy craves for. Way to go, feminist pig fuckups.
    where are the men?
  • 25th-July-2009
    MikeT

    Re: On becoming a man

    Interesting thing Percy.
    In this day and age, we have boys that aren't even allowed to grow up as boys, let alone men later on.
    The education system has more or less washed any idea of masculinity of boys, by giving them detentions for "playing too rough", "disrupting the class" (mainly because they are bored with what is being taught to them).

    The idea that boys can be effectively educated in what has become a pro-Female teacher/ pro-Female student system, is nothing short of lunacy.

    Of course, if it was the other way around, it would need to be fixed.

    But I digress, how does one actually be a "man " these days, everyone under the sun seems to have thier own opinion and we all know what Uncle Harry said about them.

    But you have to have good male role models for boys to base themselves on, for a start.

    I see no-one there at the moment, mainly because the popular media only focusses on the bad men, the hard working men that work day in, day out are avoided, because it would make the media's poster boys look bad.

    Bill that lives down the road here is what I would call a "man".
    He is retired (62) and has his grand-kids over quite regularly.
    He has taught his grand-children (11 and 13, female and male respectively) how to work with woodworking gear, respect for safety measures and a clean working ethic.
    I was bloody amazed when I called in on Bill last weekend, the kids showed me what they had built that day, damn it I could not have built what they did better myself.
    Not a wood shaving anywhere.

    Kids aren't stupid, they identify with who they can fit in with.
  • 24th-July-2009
    Zuberi

    Re: On becoming a man

    Then you won't like the rednecks in my country!!
  • 24th-July-2009
    haahoo

    Re: On becoming a man

    Single mothers CAN raise good men, but it is not very likely that they will be able to do this!

    The odds, are poor..

    The SMS brigade raise substandard males, and slag daughters.

    They program the state's shite directly into their own kids, or, they completely fail to filiter it out..

    Fathers are essential to keep the shit from their kids..

    Unless, of course, the kids have the misfortune to be have a mangina "father" (figure!)..

    The odds of such increase with each additional generation raised under SMS control..

    Not only should the SMS not be allowed to head their families (the fathers should be doing this), they should not be allowed to influence other young men either..

    Any young man listening to a Single Mother Slapper is a fool.

    They are fit for very little, above the level of what a sheep would be equally useful for!

    All they have, is what they have been given, or got the state to rob for them..
  • 24th-July-2009
    fcb98292

    Re: On becoming a man

    Single mothers do not have what it takes to raise a boy to be a man. Their instruction is full of how not to be a man, and devoid of the only real-life example that boy craves for. Way to go, feminist pig fuckups.

    Quote Quote from Marx View Post
    He got all kinds of cleaning equipment out and sat by me as he barked at me where to clean next.
    I never barked at my sons. Fear is only a good teacher in survival mode. I cleaned it with him until he learned how. If he willingly defied the instruction, he still didn't get barked at. He got spanked. It usually only took once.
  • 24th-July-2009
    Marx

    Re: On becoming a man

    I realise it's not quite the same thing, but I went from living in a single parent home to living in foster care... And I saw the difference it made to myself, both at the time and in hindsight.

    Despite all the feminists claims that many Mothers are also Fathers, they simply cannot do it like a having a Dad around for real.

    The two scenarios are worlds apart.

    And as the author explains, I was a very naughty boy prior to going into care.

    I recall a time when I had been to my Sister's house (also in foster care), and we'd rode our bikes to my home. Due to the weather, my foster parents gave her a lift home. As her bike was at mine, I offered to clean it for her.

    Big mistake.

    Initially, I wiped it over and in my eyes it was clean and done. My foster dad came out, looked at it and said "Nice start... now finish cleaning it"

    I was baffled - it was clean.

    His definition and my definition of clean were clearly not compatible. He got all kinds of cleaning equipment out and sat by me as he barked at me where to clean next.

    By God, my fingers & thumbs were aching by the time I'd finished.. it looked like a brand new bike. I was really pissed off. And I never offered to clean her bike again.
  • 24th-July-2009
    shaazam

    Re: On becoming a man

    boys have a hard time growing up to traditional manhood as such traits are crushed early by their new age feminit amoral ball breaking single mothers - sad to say

    they may even have the double misfortunate to be raised by two dykes who have received a sperm donation from some gay guy
  • 24th-July-2009
    Percy

    On becoming a man

    Trey Garrison Gets It – Raising Boys Without Men Creates ‘False Manhood’

    By Robert Franklin, Esq. | Jul 23, 2009

    Here's a good piece that appropriately refers to what we see so much of these days as "false manhood" (Dallas Morning News, 7/17/09). Trey Garrison recalls what growing up with his father was like. In childhood he didn't understand what his dad was trying to do, and he often didn't like it. Now he understands - his father was trying to teach him to be a man. Judging from his article, he succeeded.

    I don't agree with everything in the piece, but most of it I do. Garrison understands that we've got a generation of boys who've grown up without a man around to do exactly what his father did for him. What we've learned is that boys who grow up without men and who then try to teach other boys, produce grown-up boys. What Garrison's father taught him and what so few boys receive these days is this:

    A man is honest, fair and just. He has an honest — and not posturing — sense of self-respect. He’s self-reliant, and he’s responsible for his family. He has humility, grace and respect for others. Above all, he has a sense of humor — especially about himself — and a sense of perspective.

    I like that, particularly the part about "not posturing." That's exactly what you see from young men on the streets, the gangbangers - posturing. That's not what men do, it's what males in men's bodies who've grown up without men do. They're guessing at what masculinity is like. And they're getting it wrong.

    Look at the nouns Garrison uses -- self-respect, self-reliance, humility, perspective, grace. Those are traits of men that boys need to learn. Our four-decades-old theory that women can instill in boys those traits and that wisdom has been proven wrong.

    That's no criticism of mothers. Mothers, like fathers, do what they do best, but mothers, like fathers, have their shortcomings. What we know now is that, as a rule, both are required to raise kids with the best outcomes. Garrison gets that. More and more people do every day.


    Trey Garrison: Breaking the cycle of 'false manhood'

    03:46 PM CDT on Friday, July 17, 2009



    http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/dn/opinion/points/stories/DN-garrison_19edi.4da8a145.html


    Growing up with my dad was like being Daniel Larusso to Mr. Miyagi in The Karate Kid. There were all these rules that made no sense. Paint the fence. Wax on, wax off. Study. Control yourself. Clean up your mess. Focus, Daniel-san.

    I didn’t get it at the time, but I’ve come to learn it wasn’t to make me miserable. It was to try to make me into a man.

    No easy task. A man is honest, fair and just. He has an honest — and not posturing — sense of self-respect. He’s self-reliant, and he’s responsible for his family. He has humility, grace and respect for others. Above all, he has a sense of humor — especially about himself — and a sense of perspective.

    No one likes to hear this because we’re all supposed to pretend that there’s no real difference between men and women. But there’s a politically incorrect fact of life: It takes a man to raise a man. (Stick to the truth even when it’s not popular — dad’s life lesson No. 3.)

    A boy at birth is an intelligent, tool-using primate with natural instincts of aggression, competition, and, yes, violence. You have to shape, curb and refine those natural instincts, so that they serve the boy in ways that are positive for him and all around him. With rare exceptions, what that requires is a father or other strong male role model in the home, every day.

    This is the first thing that came to mind when, after another round of murders, I was asked why there’s so much violence in southern Dallas, especially in the black community. (Before I go any further, let’s make this clear: “Violence within the black community” doesn’t mean the majority are perpetrators or victims of violence. I’m talking about a group within a group.)

    Why so many homicides? I think too many black males aren’t black men.
    Study after study shows that kids — especially boys — from single-parent households are twice as likely to commit crimes as kids from families where the father is present, regardless of ethnicity. Now look at these numbers: More than 70 percent of out-of-wedlock births are to black women, according to the Centers for Disease Control. That means you have boys growing up never learning the basics of manhood. Not just in this house or that — whole neighborhoods.

    It wasn’t always like this. Before we started killing the black family with kindness through welfare, single-parent black households were the exception in this country.

    In 1960, just 22 percent of black households were headed by a single mother — less than the percentage of single-parent white households today. By 1970, it was 29 percent. By 1990, 40 percent. Today? Seven of every 10.

    Call it the “Not-So-Great Society.”

    Absent a father in the home, these boys don’t have a clue what manhood is, so they hide behind false, emotional and violent bravado. They think violence is an assertion of manhood. Minor insults become fighting words when your manhood is faux and fragile. What two men with confidence would let be just an argument becomes a fight. What should just be a fight becomes a shootout. Inmate logic. Be the baddest or be on the bottom bunk, so to speak. (Real men know insults come from small people not worth noticing — another lesson from dad. No. 23, I think.)

    The numbers from the U.S. Department of Justice don’t lie, and you’re fooling yourself if you think it has nothing to do with the culture of false manhood that’s risen in the absence of fathers. Almost half of all violent crimes are committed by black males, though they represent just seven percent of the U.S. population. In 2005, homicide victimization rates for blacks were six times higher than the rates for whites, and offending rates for blacks were more than seven times higher than the rates for whites.
    That doesn’t make it a black thing. And it’s neither a race thing nor a poverty thing.

    It’s a man thing.

    Barbara Dafoe Whitehead, co-director of the National Marriage Project at Rutgers University, cited exhaustive studies when she wrote in The Atlantic Monthly that the “relationship [between single-parent families and crime] is so strong that controlling for family configuration erases the relationship between race and crime and between low income and crime.”
    If you want to stop the violence, you have to get fathers back to raising their kids. Period. Full stop.

    I don’t know how to do this, but we can’t talk solutions until we’re honest about what the problem is. (Lesson No. 15 from dad.)
    If you want to look at my mug shot below and discount what I’m saying because of the color you see, fine. Listen to what this other guy had to say:
    “We know the statistics — that children who grow up without a father are five times more likely to live in poverty and commit crime; nine times more likely to drop out of schools and twenty times more likely to end up in prison. … We need fathers to realize that responsibility does not end at conception. We need them to realize that what makes you a man is not the ability to have a child — it’s the courage to raise one.”

    If you don’t agree with that, send him a letter. He, it turns out, is the rare exception to the usual outcome of growing up in a fatherless home. His address is 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington D.C. He lives there with his wife and his two kids.

    Trey Garrison is a free-lance writer and contributing editor for D Magazine. He can be reached through www.treygarrison.com.

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