Greetings!! Is this your first visit? If so, please consider registering. It enables downloads and removal of adverts. Use the 'facebook connect' for quick access.
Register
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 23
  1. #1
    Zuberi's Avatar
    Zuberi is offline Established Member
    Member Since
    Jul 2008
    Location
    You figure it out!!!
    Posts
    11,535

    Teacher's brutal attack on boy, 13, at U.S. school posted on YouTube

    Story here. Excerpt:
    "A schoolteacher has been fired after she brutally attacked a 13-year-old pupil in front of a classroom full of students, according to US reports.
    Shocking video footage appears to show Sheri Davis dragging, kicking and slapping sixth grader Isaiah Johnson after squaring up to him as he cowered in a corner.
    The alleged beating is thought to have lasted almost a minute and was filmed on a mobile phone by another pupils before being posted on YouTube.
    Officials at Jamie's House Charter School, a centre for children with disciplinary issues in Houston, Texas, are reportedly 'horrified'.
    The 40-year-old teacher has been sacked and bosses have apologised to the youngster and his furious mother, Alesha Johnson.
    Police have been called in to investigate amid public outcry, which came after the video was obtained by Ms Johnson and aired on Houston's Fox News channel.
    Some children can be heard laughing on the tape as Isaiah struggles to defend himself against the teacher.
    'I was on the wall like this trying to get away from her and she started hitting me, banging my head to the wall and kicking me,' Isaiah said.
    'The teachers piled up and they were looking over each others shoulders just watching.'"


    Yet another reason why kids bring guns to school!

  2. #2
    rohara's Avatar
    rohara is offline RIP Thomas Ball
    Member Since
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern Va.
    Posts
    2,029

    Re: Teacher's brutal attack on boy, 13, at U.S. school posted on YouTube

    Here is a youtube vid of the news story:

    YouTube - Houston Teacher Fired for Beating Student in Class

    Ok here is the deal. This is a grown woman who viciously attacked a young male student. She was fired. Question: Why the fuck wasn't she arrested? If this boy had done ANYTHING to defend himself, like......hit back, he would have been arrested and charged AS AN ADULT!
    Last edited by rohara; 13th-May-2010 at 09:59 PM.
    Do not ever suppose that a small group of people can never change the world. INDEED it is the only thing that ever has.

    Anonymous.

  3. #3
    Percy's Avatar
    Percy is online now Knackered old Knight
    Member Since
    May 2006
    Location
    Overlooking the D'Entrecasteaux Channel. The views are magnificent.
    Posts
    18,237

    Re: Teacher's brutal attack on boy, 13, at U.S. school posted on YouTube

    What had happened in the minutes preceeding, I wonder.
    When in need of a drink to Refresh the soul
    Drop into the Knight & Drummer Free House.
    http://parzivalshorse.blogspot.com.au/
    Always leave a Comment as a tip.


    Cum dilectione hominum et odio vitiorum
    Love the Sinner but not the Sin.
    (St. Augustine)

    For we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against Principalities, against Powers,
    against the Rulers of the Darkness of this world, against Spiritual Wickedness in high places. “
    (and within ourselves)


    A Feminist is a human being who has lost her way and turned vicious. If you meet one on the road as you
    Go your Own Way, offer kindness but keep your sword drawn.





  4. #4
    Zuberi's Avatar
    Zuberi is offline Established Member
    Member Since
    Jul 2008
    Location
    You figure it out!!!
    Posts
    11,535

    Re: Teacher's brutal attack on boy, 13, at U.S. school posted on YouTube

    Quote Quote from rohara View Post
    Here is a youtube vid of the news story:

    YouTube - Houston Teacher Fired for Beating Student in Class

    Ok here is the deal. This is a grown woman who viciously attacked a young male student. She was fired. Question: Why the fuck wasn't she arrested? If this boy had done ANYTHING to defend himself, like......hit back, he would have been arrested and charged AS AN ADULT!
    That teacher was already a troublemaker.


    Teacher in Beating Video Had Warrant for Arrest While Teaching
    40-year old Sheri Lynn Davis has had a warrant out for her arrest since March of last year, according to the Harris County District Attorney's Office.

  5. #5
    omegaflux's Avatar
    omegaflux is offline Established Member
    Member Since
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    832

    Re: Teacher's brutal attack on boy, 13, at U.S. school posted on YouTube

    Why hasn't this woman been arrested yet? The police are "investigating" the incident. An investigation is meant to uncover evidence, something they already have in the form of the video. There is clear and convincing evidence of an assault but she has not yet been charged. If it was a male teacher that used one-tenth of the force this woman did against a female student, we all know he would be headed for the gallows.

  6. #6
    Marx's Avatar
    Marx is offline Administrator
    Member Since
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Midlands
    Posts
    21,636
    My Blog Entries:
    67

    Re: Teacher's brutal attack on boy, 13, at U.S. school posted on YouTube

    They have to investigate in case a man forced her to do it, somehow....
    The most offensive thing you can do to a feminist is treat her with FULL equality.
    --Just because you're offended, doesn't mean you're right.--


    Antimisandry now offers it's members personal sub-forums
    (click here to register yours)


    ►A Decade of Investment in YOUR Future. ►AntiMisandry.com

  7. #7
    Kargan3033's Avatar
    Kargan3033 is offline Established Member
    Member Since
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    3,279

    Re: Teacher's brutal attack on boy, 13, at U.S. school posted on YouTube

    GOD DAMNIT!
    This is bullshit!
    Investgation my ass!
    It was clearly seen by all that this was a clear case of assult, the only reason why this bitch has not yet been arested is because she's a female and as well all know
    " females never do anything worng "
    It does not matter if the boy started this, if he had done something worng he should have been sent to the princable or given a detention.
    Teachers do not have the right to beat on a student.
    As was said if this had been a male teacher he would have been shitcanned to the big house by now
    When the femanazis tell me it's their way or the highway I tell them to fuck off and die, because at lest the highway leads to new and intresting places, their ways is a dead end.

  8. #8
    Zuberi's Avatar
    Zuberi is offline Established Member
    Member Since
    Jul 2008
    Location
    You figure it out!!!
    Posts
    11,535

    Re: Teacher's brutal attack on boy, 13, at U.S. school posted on YouTube

    Quote Quote from Kargan3033 View Post
    GOD DAMNIT!
    This is bullshit!
    Investgation my ass!
    It was clearly seen by all that this was a clear case of assult, the only reason why this bitch has not yet been arested is because she's a female and as well all know
    " females never do anything worng "
    It does not matter if the boy started this, if he had done something worng he should have been sent to the princable or given a detention.
    Teachers do not have the right to beat on a student.
    As was said if this had been a male teacher he would have been shitcanned to the big house by now
    Story here.
    'HOUSTON - The family of a 13-year-old whose beating by a Houston charter school teacher was caught on a classmate's cell phone video has filed a lawsuit against the teacher and the school.
    Science teacher Sheri Lynn Davis was fired Monday night from Jamie's House Charter School. Her dismissal came after video of Reagins' beating became public.
    The lawsuit was filed Thursday on behalf of Isaiah Reagins by his mother, Alesha Johnson.
    His family says the boy suffered a black eye and other bruises. Johnson says she's taken her son out of the school.
    Davis' attorney, Chip Lewis, says he and his client will have a Friday news conference.
    A spokeswoman for the school said she couldn't comment on the lawsuit but that school officials feel they handled the situation appropriately after learning of it.'

  9. #9
    Kargan3033's Avatar
    Kargan3033 is offline Established Member
    Member Since
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    3,279

    Re: Teacher's brutal attack on boy, 13, at U.S. school posted on YouTube

    Quote Quote from Zuberi View Post
    Story here.
    'HOUSTON - The family of a 13-year-old whose beating by a Houston charter school teacher was caught on a classmate's cell phone video has filed a lawsuit against the teacher and the school.
    Science teacher Sheri Lynn Davis was fired Monday night from Jamie's House Charter School. Her dismissal came after video of Reagins' beating became public.
    The lawsuit was filed Thursday on behalf of Isaiah Reagins by his mother, Alesha Johnson.
    His family says the boy suffered a black eye and other bruises. Johnson says she's taken her son out of the school.
    Davis' attorney, Chip Lewis, says he and his client will have a Friday news conference.
    A spokeswoman for the school said she couldn't comment on the lawsuit but that school officials feel they handled the situation appropriately after learning of it.'
    Good I hope they sue them large for this, as for the school officials say they handled this appropriately is bullshit, if it had been a male teacher he would have been arested on the spot.
    I hope this bitch does time and is banned from teaching or working with kids because you know if it had been a man that did this that's what would have been done to him once he got out of jail.
    When the femanazis tell me it's their way or the highway I tell them to fuck off and die, because at lest the highway leads to new and intresting places, their ways is a dead end.

  10. #10
    omegaflux's Avatar
    omegaflux is offline Established Member
    Member Since
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    832

    Re: Teacher's brutal attack on boy, 13, at U.S. school posted on YouTube

    This woman is still free. What are the cops doing. According to this article, they still haven't talked to the boy, school, or teacher. Let's compare this to when a student does something wrong. This 12 year old girl was handcuffed and arrested for doodling on her desk. This 15 year old boy was handcuffed, arrested, and charged with a felony for throwing a pencil that hit a custodian in the shoulder. There's plenty of these instances. Now that the roles are reversed, the cops are nowhere to be found.

  11. #11
    Incognito's Avatar
    Incognito is offline Established Member
    Member Since
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    11,309
    My Blog Entries:
    1

    Re: Teacher's brutal attack on boy, 13, at U.S. school posted on YouTube

    That teacher should be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.

    "Civilization can only revive when there shall come into being in a number of individuals a new tone of mind, independent of the prevalent one among the crowds, and in opposition to it- a tone of mind which will gradually win influence over the collective one, and in the end determine its character. Only an ethical movement can rescue us from barbarism, and the ethical comes into existence only in individuals."

    "Until he extends his circle of compassion to include all living things, man will not himself find peace."
    -Albert Schweitzer

  12. #12
    Nynrah Ghost's Avatar
    Nynrah Ghost is offline Established Member
    Member Since
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    1,594

    Re: Teacher's brutal attack on boy, 13, at U.S. school posted on YouTube

    This was a very brutal and cowardly attack. For those who watched the video, or saw a few pictures, she stood there as a raging animal in front of a cowering child. How low can an adult go? For christ's sake, its a child; children can't defend themselves from adults.

    And to think teachers are supposed to be examples... just like other civil servants like police officers etc.

    P.S.: As far as I've understood, the attack was not justified either. She just charged in like 'So, you want to hit girls?!' and started her disgusting frenzy right away without even considering what was actually going on. No hits were exchanged if I recall right, so that alone already completely unjustifies the whole 'reason' for attacking.

  13. #13
    Percy's Avatar
    Percy is online now Knackered old Knight
    Member Since
    May 2006
    Location
    Overlooking the D'Entrecasteaux Channel. The views are magnificent.
    Posts
    18,237

    Re: Teacher's brutal attack on boy, 13, at U.S. school posted on YouTube

    Quote Quote from Percy View Post
    What had happened in the minutes preceeding, I wonder.
    I see no-one has considered this.

    While I deplore such viciousness, what DID happen up to that point?

    It is easy to make a man (boy) - woman thing of this but only if you ignore context.

    The whole school systen is falling apart.

    http://www.grumpyoldsod.com/schools%205.asp


    Dylan stands up, dashes across the room to snatch his friend’s pencil case and promptly tosses the contents into the air. When I order him to sit down, he laughs, climbs on to the window ledge and begins to hiss. Some of the other children in the class of 14-year-olds join in. As I attempt to persuade Dylan to get down, another pupil, Richard, grabs his neighbour Rory by the neck and wrestles him to the floor.

    ‘Stop it, Richard,’ I shout, trying to pull them apart. His response is to reply: ‘Oi, Miss, you ain’t allowed to touch us. That’s assault, that is.’ His victim, meanwhile, scrambles back to his chair. The hissing has become jeering and a paper ball sails across the classroom, closely followed by someone’s PE kit.

    It is a chaotic scene, but don’t be fooled into thinking it is in any way unusual. Like it or not, this is life in the average classroom of an average comprehensive. And during the ten years that I’ve been teaching in state secondary schools, I can honestly say that the standard of behaviour has imploded.

    You may shrug off bad behaviour as being down to a teacher’s inability to control their class but believe me, these days every state school teacher I know, regardless of ability, has been subject to swearing, physical fighting and constant disruption on nearly a daily basis. What’s more, there are incidents of physical violence towards us too. I, personally, have been shoved aside by one 15-year-old pupil, who was annoyed at being kept for detention. I’ve had coins and pencils thrown at me and colleagues of mine have been bitten, kicked in the stomach and on the legs.

    None of the children who assaulted us was expelled. These are the reasons why I am now seriously considering spending at least £9,000 a year to send my four-year-old daughter to private school when the time comes.

    As a staunch supporter of the state system, this is something I never believed I would even consider. But my ideals of equality have been well and truly trampled under foot. Behaviour in many schools is now so appalling that I just cannot risk my daughter having to witness the things that as a teacher I have grown depressingly accustomed to.

    An extreme example of the catastrophic state of our schools is that of science teacher Peter Harvey. Last week he was cleared of attempting to murder one of his pupils. He had pleaded guilty to causing grievous bodily harm after repeatedly hitting a 14-year-old boy over the head with a 3kg dumbbell and shouting ‘Die, die, die’ as he did so. The jury was shown footage of the moments leading up to the attack that left the boy with a fractured skull.

    A girl in the classroom had been secretly filming with a camcorder as the class taunted and goaded their teacher. They were hoping that he would snap and humiliate himself, perhaps swear or cry. They would then disseminate the footage around the school.

    The teenagers knew that Mr Harvey had been off sick with stress and depression, but thought it amusing to ‘wind him up’. They hadn’t expected that he would lose all self-control and attack a boy described at Harvey’s trial as a ‘known troublemaker’, but that’s exactly what happened.

    Tragically, Peter Harvey’s experience is far from unique. Most teachers reading about the events in his classroom, in a school rated ‘good’ by the government inspectorate Ofsted, will recognise the raucous and calculating behaviour of pupils.

    Some of the children came into the class intent on disrupting it at any price. Pupils were shouting, running about having mock sword fights with wooden rulers, chasing one another with Bunsen burners and generally causing havoc and mayhem. When Peter Harvey asked the boy, who cannot be identified for legal reasons, to sit down, the teenager insolently turned his back and told his teacher to ‘**** off’.

    It was then that Harvey, a teacher for 16 years at All Saints Roman Catholic School in Mansfield, Nottinghamshire, snapped and launched his attack. Of course, what Peter Harvey did cannot be condoned, but I do understand only too well the terrible sense of anger, frustration and humiliation he must have felt that day.

    I, too, have worked with children who deliberately set out to disrupt and destroy lessons. I don’t believe that there can be many state school teachers in Britain who haven’t. Like Peter Harvey, whom witnesses at his trial described as a good and dedicated teacher, I have put many hours into preparing lessons to captivate and interest my class, only to watch as the lesson is hijacked and wantonly destroyed by disruptive pupils.

    You may think back to your own schooldays and recall pupils being cheeky and showing no enthusiasm for learning. But, believe me, long gone are the days when disobedience amounted to a crafty fag behind the bike sheds or reading a magazine under the desk instead of copying out notes on Macbeth.

    Now, shouting and swearing at staff is commonplace, and you can utter a perfectly reasonable request to be met with a fury that beggars belief. Ask a pupil to sit down or be quiet and chairs might be kicked over, desks sent flying — followed by the obligatory foul-mouthed tirade.

    Over the past ten years, I have been an English teacher in three state secondary schools in the South-East. Last year, for the first time in my career, I walked out of a classroom. Halfway through the lesson, in a school classed by Ofsted as ‘good’, I packed my bags and left because the behaviour in that room was so dreadful that had I stayed I would have either burst into tears or thumped one of my 15-year-old pupils.

    That day, my carefully prepared handouts had been screwed up and thrown around the room as children ran about jumping on chairs and chucking one another’s bags around. One of the boys, Mark, a persistent troublemaker, refused to sit his place. He plonked himself down in someone else’s chair, feet on the desk and whipped out his phone. When I tried to confiscate it, he simply laughed at me. ‘**** off! You ain’t having that,’ he jeered.

    When another boy, Andrew, started chucking paper aeroplanes across the room and the rest of the class started whistling and chanting raucously, I walked out. I’d had enough. I was at breaking point.

    It might not sound as if anything particularly outrageous occurred that day. But what had broken me wasn’t the bad behaviour, but the personal nature of it. Children have always been mischievous, and teachers can cope with that, but what’s new is the proliferation of swearing and deliberate attempts to humiliate us.

    The first time a pupil swore at me was five years ago. It was a girl — don’t be fooled, they can be just as bad as boys — and I had asked her to leave my classroom as she wasn’t supposed to be in my lesson. The response was: ‘F*** off, you sad b****!’ I was frozen to the spot with shock. But now I can honestly say that perhaps three days in every five I’m sworn at or personally insulted in some way or another.

    You might wonder why we teachers stand for it, but largely our hands are tied.

    Take this example — one pupil swore at me, hit a fellow pupil over the head, tipped pencil cases to the floor, called another a ‘w*****’. I complained to the head teacher, only to be told the pupil in question is attending anger management classes. When I pointed out that their behaviour was preventing all of her classmates from learning, I was told that there was nothing anyone could do. We just had to curb the behaviour as best we could.

    So how have we descended to this level? In my opinion, the Government’s policy of inclusion — whereby even extremely disturbed and aggressive children are taught in mainstream schools — is largely to blame. Special schools — where children with severe emotional and behavioural difficulties were educated in tiny classes by teachers trained to deal with their complex needs — have been closed. Now, those children are educated in mainstream comprehensives by people like me, who just aren’t equipped to deal with them.

    I’ve grown accustomed — as have my colleagues — to watching groups of teenagers in hoodies marauding around the school, banging on classroom windows, opening the doors and shouting insults into lessons. Sometimes they even beckon other children out of classes to have a fight or disrupt someone else’s lessons. When they’re challenged about their behaviour, most of these children simply sneer: ‘We ain’t got to go to classes, we’re in anger management.’

    In the past few years, schools have started to spend tens of thousands of pounds employing counsellors to teach youngsters ‘anger management’. Inclusion in this nebulous group gives pupils carte blanche to behave in any way they please, without having to take the slightest responsibility for their actions.

    And what of the parents? Complain to them about their children’s behaviour and it’s quite likely that you’ll be met with a shrugging indifference. On one occasion, I rang a mother to complain about her daughter’s abusive language and was told to ‘lighten up’.

    Other parents become angry and foulmouthed themselves. My friend Joanna, a tiny woman of five foot, was screamed at and threatened in her classroom by an enraged father. She’d kept his daughter in for a detention and was accused of ‘picking on’ the girl. With role models like that, it’s little wonder that so many of our children are violent thugs.

    As for expulsion, schools are loath to do this to unruly pupils because there are financial penalties. And the policy of inclusion has meant that children expelled from one comprehensive on Friday afternoon will just turn up on Monday morning at another one five miles down the road. It is no wonder that a survey of more than 1,000 teachers carried out by the teachers’ union ATL in March found more than 50 per cent had experienced verbal abuse this academic year and almost 40 per cent had been intimidated.

    These figures, shocking though they are, I believe, underestimate the problem. Many teachers don’t like to admit that they’ve been abused and intimidated, feeling that somehow it reflects badly on them rather than on the pupils who push, shove and swear their way through the school day.

    My friend, Carol, confides that violence in the classroom has got much worse. ‘I was knocked over by some boys shoving their way out of the room after I’d tried to keep them in for a lunchtime detention. One of them punched me hard on the arm first,’ she tells me. She is now considering quitting the profession after 15 years. Even more shockingly, another colleague, Mary, was punched in the face after a 13-year-old lost his temper when she confiscated his mobile phone.

    I’ve worked in schools that Ofsted has deemed to be failing, and the behaviour was atrocious. I’ve also worked in schools that like Peter Harvey’s were rated ‘good’ by Ofsted, and the behaviour was equally dreadful. Many of my teaching colleagues admit almost shamefacedly to educating their children in the private sector.

    For those of us who’ve spent our lives teaching in comprehensives, there is a sense that we are letting the side down by turning to private schools for our own children. But we see what’s happening in our classrooms and we are left with little choice.

    Hence my plans for my own daughter. The difference is that no private school would tolerate behaviour even half as bad as that now taken for granted in state schools. If children turned up in classes intent on disrupting them in any way possible, then parents would be asked to take them elsewhere. I’m a mild-mannered person, I’ve never smacked my daughter, or even raised my voice to her, and yet there have been days at work when I’ve felt so utterly humiliated that I’ve wanted to punch the next child who screws up my handout and tells me to ‘**** off’ when I protest.

    Although my colleagues and I accept that what Peter Harvey did was wrong, there can’t be a state school teacher in the country who doesn’t at some level understand exactly why he did what he did.



    The GOS says: I believe every word of this article.

    I was a classroom teacher for twenty years, and I suppose I had a pretty easy ride. The schools I taught in were good, the pupils pleasant and fairly well-behaved, and I rarely had any difficulty with discipline. If I'm honest, being a man and over six feet tall helped – don't let anyone tell you it doesn't make a difference.

    I left the classroom and moved into management for a number of years, then retired. At the beginning of my retirement I received calls from two head teachers I knew. One asked me to go into his comprehensive in a seaside town and cover for an absent colleague a couple of days a week. He was desperate, so I did it for half a term until he was able to make a more permanent arrangement. It wasn't hard. The kids didn't know much, but they were cheerful and willing to have a go at anything you put in front of them, and perfectly well behaved.

    This positive experience made me confident when I received a cry for help from the second head, this time from a minor private school. Well, I thought, small classes, nice middle-class kids, I obviously haven't lost my touch, this should be a piece of cake.

    How wrong I was. They were a bunch of right little sods, frankly, and the laziest people I have ever encountered. Their determination to do as little as possible was staggering, their respect for authority miniscule, and their confidence in their own invulnerability colossal. It was only a few weeks before I decided that I'd done my bit for the youth of this country, and that a retired gentleman of advancing years should have better things to do with his time ...

    So yes, as I say ... I believe every word of this article. And let no one offend me by suggesting that it's the fault of the teachers. I won't deny that standards have fallen in recent years, but teachers are supposed to teach, not act as warders, policemen, security guards, or punchbags. For many years they have been able to rely on their own determination, aura of authority and a loud voice. If those no longer work, they have nothing to fall back on - they're allowed nothing to fall back on. And if they can't get on with their jobs, it's high time we policed the corridors with security guards. With big sticks. How's that as an opportunity for non-commissioned officers retiring from the forces?

    When in need of a drink to Refresh the soul
    Drop into the Knight & Drummer Free House.
    http://parzivalshorse.blogspot.com.au/
    Always leave a Comment as a tip.


    Cum dilectione hominum et odio vitiorum
    Love the Sinner but not the Sin.
    (St. Augustine)

    For we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against Principalities, against Powers,
    against the Rulers of the Darkness of this world, against Spiritual Wickedness in high places. “
    (and within ourselves)


    A Feminist is a human being who has lost her way and turned vicious. If you meet one on the road as you
    Go your Own Way, offer kindness but keep your sword drawn.





  14. #14
    Percy's Avatar
    Percy is online now Knackered old Knight
    Member Since
    May 2006
    Location
    Overlooking the D'Entrecasteaux Channel. The views are magnificent.
    Posts
    18,237

    Re: Teacher's brutal attack on boy, 13, at U.S. school posted on YouTube

    Quote Quote from Percy View Post
    What had happened in the minutes preceeding, I wonder.
    I see no-one has considered this.

    While I deplore such viciousness, what DID happen up to that point?

    It is easy to make a man (boy) - woman thing of this but only if you ignore context.

    The whole school systen is falling apart.

    http://www.grumpyoldsod.com/schools%205.asp


    Dylan stands up, dashes across the room to snatch his friend’s pencil case and promptly tosses the contents into the air. When I order him to sit down, he laughs, climbs on to the window ledge and begins to hiss. Some of the other children in the class of 14-year-olds join in. As I attempt to persuade Dylan to get down, another pupil, Richard, grabs his neighbour Rory by the neck and wrestles him to the floor.

    ‘Stop it, Richard,’ I shout, trying to pull them apart. His response is to reply: ‘Oi, Miss, you ain’t allowed to touch us. That’s assault, that is.’ His victim, meanwhile, scrambles back to his chair. The hissing has become jeering and a paper ball sails across the classroom, closely followed by someone’s PE kit.

    It is a chaotic scene, but don’t be fooled into thinking it is in any way unusual. Like it or not, this is life in the average classroom of an average comprehensive. And during the ten years that I’ve been teaching in state secondary schools, I can honestly say that the standard of behaviour has imploded.

    You may shrug off bad behaviour as being down to a teacher’s inability to control their class but believe me, these days every state school teacher I know, regardless of ability, has been subject to swearing, physical fighting and constant disruption on nearly a daily basis. What’s more, there are incidents of physical violence towards us too. I, personally, have been shoved aside by one 15-year-old pupil, who was annoyed at being kept for detention. I’ve had coins and pencils thrown at me and colleagues of mine have been bitten, kicked in the stomach and on the legs.

    None of the children who assaulted us was expelled. These are the reasons why I am now seriously considering spending at least £9,000 a year to send my four-year-old daughter to private school when the time comes.

    As a staunch supporter of the state system, this is something I never believed I would even consider. But my ideals of equality have been well and truly trampled under foot. Behaviour in many schools is now so appalling that I just cannot risk my daughter having to witness the things that as a teacher I have grown depressingly accustomed to.

    An extreme example of the catastrophic state of our schools is that of science teacher Peter Harvey. Last week he was cleared of attempting to murder one of his pupils. He had pleaded guilty to causing grievous bodily harm after repeatedly hitting a 14-year-old boy over the head with a 3kg dumbbell and shouting ‘Die, die, die’ as he did so. The jury was shown footage of the moments leading up to the attack that left the boy with a fractured skull.

    A girl in the classroom had been secretly filming with a camcorder as the class taunted and goaded their teacher. They were hoping that he would snap and humiliate himself, perhaps swear or cry. They would then disseminate the footage around the school.

    The teenagers knew that Mr Harvey had been off sick with stress and depression, but thought it amusing to ‘wind him up’. They hadn’t expected that he would lose all self-control and attack a boy described at Harvey’s trial as a ‘known troublemaker’, but that’s exactly what happened.

    Tragically, Peter Harvey’s experience is far from unique. Most teachers reading about the events in his classroom, in a school rated ‘good’ by the government inspectorate Ofsted, will recognise the raucous and calculating behaviour of pupils.

    Some of the children came into the class intent on disrupting it at any price. Pupils were shouting, running about having mock sword fights with wooden rulers, chasing one another with Bunsen burners and generally causing havoc and mayhem. When Peter Harvey asked the boy, who cannot be identified for legal reasons, to sit down, the teenager insolently turned his back and told his teacher to ‘**** off’.

    It was then that Harvey, a teacher for 16 years at All Saints Roman Catholic School in Mansfield, Nottinghamshire, snapped and launched his attack. Of course, what Peter Harvey did cannot be condoned, but I do understand only too well the terrible sense of anger, frustration and humiliation he must have felt that day.

    I, too, have worked with children who deliberately set out to disrupt and destroy lessons. I don’t believe that there can be many state school teachers in Britain who haven’t. Like Peter Harvey, whom witnesses at his trial described as a good and dedicated teacher, I have put many hours into preparing lessons to captivate and interest my class, only to watch as the lesson is hijacked and wantonly destroyed by disruptive pupils.

    You may think back to your own schooldays and recall pupils being cheeky and showing no enthusiasm for learning. But, believe me, long gone are the days when disobedience amounted to a crafty fag behind the bike sheds or reading a magazine under the desk instead of copying out notes on Macbeth.

    Now, shouting and swearing at staff is commonplace, and you can utter a perfectly reasonable request to be met with a fury that beggars belief. Ask a pupil to sit down or be quiet and chairs might be kicked over, desks sent flying — followed by the obligatory foul-mouthed tirade.

    Over the past ten years, I have been an English teacher in three state secondary schools in the South-East. Last year, for the first time in my career, I walked out of a classroom. Halfway through the lesson, in a school classed by Ofsted as ‘good’, I packed my bags and left because the behaviour in that room was so dreadful that had I stayed I would have either burst into tears or thumped one of my 15-year-old pupils.

    That day, my carefully prepared handouts had been screwed up and thrown around the room as children ran about jumping on chairs and chucking one another’s bags around. One of the boys, Mark, a persistent troublemaker, refused to sit his place. He plonked himself down in someone else’s chair, feet on the desk and whipped out his phone. When I tried to confiscate it, he simply laughed at me. ‘**** off! You ain’t having that,’ he jeered.

    When another boy, Andrew, started chucking paper aeroplanes across the room and the rest of the class started whistling and chanting raucously, I walked out. I’d had enough. I was at breaking point.

    It might not sound as if anything particularly outrageous occurred that day. But what had broken me wasn’t the bad behaviour, but the personal nature of it. Children have always been mischievous, and teachers can cope with that, but what’s new is the proliferation of swearing and deliberate attempts to humiliate us.

    The first time a pupil swore at me was five years ago. It was a girl — don’t be fooled, they can be just as bad as boys — and I had asked her to leave my classroom as she wasn’t supposed to be in my lesson. The response was: ‘F*** off, you sad b****!’ I was frozen to the spot with shock. But now I can honestly say that perhaps three days in every five I’m sworn at or personally insulted in some way or another.

    You might wonder why we teachers stand for it, but largely our hands are tied.

    Take this example — one pupil swore at me, hit a fellow pupil over the head, tipped pencil cases to the floor, called another a ‘w*****’. I complained to the head teacher, only to be told the pupil in question is attending anger management classes. When I pointed out that their behaviour was preventing all of her classmates from learning, I was told that there was nothing anyone could do. We just had to curb the behaviour as best we could.

    So how have we descended to this level? In my opinion, the Government’s policy of inclusion — whereby even extremely disturbed and aggressive children are taught in mainstream schools — is largely to blame. Special schools — where children with severe emotional and behavioural difficulties were educated in tiny classes by teachers trained to deal with their complex needs — have been closed. Now, those children are educated in mainstream comprehensives by people like me, who just aren’t equipped to deal with them.

    I’ve grown accustomed — as have my colleagues — to watching groups of teenagers in hoodies marauding around the school, banging on classroom windows, opening the doors and shouting insults into lessons. Sometimes they even beckon other children out of classes to have a fight or disrupt someone else’s lessons. When they’re challenged about their behaviour, most of these children simply sneer: ‘We ain’t got to go to classes, we’re in anger management.’

    In the past few years, schools have started to spend tens of thousands of pounds employing counsellors to teach youngsters ‘anger management’. Inclusion in this nebulous group gives pupils carte blanche to behave in any way they please, without having to take the slightest responsibility for their actions.

    And what of the parents? Complain to them about their children’s behaviour and it’s quite likely that you’ll be met with a shrugging indifference. On one occasion, I rang a mother to complain about her daughter’s abusive language and was told to ‘lighten up’.

    Other parents become angry and foulmouthed themselves. My friend Joanna, a tiny woman of five foot, was screamed at and threatened in her classroom by an enraged father. She’d kept his daughter in for a detention and was accused of ‘picking on’ the girl. With role models like that, it’s little wonder that so many of our children are violent thugs.

    As for expulsion, schools are loath to do this to unruly pupils because there are financial penalties. And the policy of inclusion has meant that children expelled from one comprehensive on Friday afternoon will just turn up on Monday morning at another one five miles down the road. It is no wonder that a survey of more than 1,000 teachers carried out by the teachers’ union ATL in March found more than 50 per cent had experienced verbal abuse this academic year and almost 40 per cent had been intimidated.

    These figures, shocking though they are, I believe, underestimate the problem. Many teachers don’t like to admit that they’ve been abused and intimidated, feeling that somehow it reflects badly on them rather than on the pupils who push, shove and swear their way through the school day.

    My friend, Carol, confides that violence in the classroom has got much worse. ‘I was knocked over by some boys shoving their way out of the room after I’d tried to keep them in for a lunchtime detention. One of them punched me hard on the arm first,’ she tells me. She is now considering quitting the profession after 15 years. Even more shockingly, another colleague, Mary, was punched in the face after a 13-year-old lost his temper when she confiscated his mobile phone.

    I’ve worked in schools that Ofsted has deemed to be failing, and the behaviour was atrocious. I’ve also worked in schools that like Peter Harvey’s were rated ‘good’ by Ofsted, and the behaviour was equally dreadful. Many of my teaching colleagues admit almost shamefacedly to educating their children in the private sector.

    For those of us who’ve spent our lives teaching in comprehensives, there is a sense that we are letting the side down by turning to private schools for our own children. But we see what’s happening in our classrooms and we are left with little choice.

    Hence my plans for my own daughter. The difference is that no private school would tolerate behaviour even half as bad as that now taken for granted in state schools. If children turned up in classes intent on disrupting them in any way possible, then parents would be asked to take them elsewhere. I’m a mild-mannered person, I’ve never smacked my daughter, or even raised my voice to her, and yet there have been days at work when I’ve felt so utterly humiliated that I’ve wanted to punch the next child who screws up my handout and tells me to ‘**** off’ when I protest.

    Although my colleagues and I accept that what Peter Harvey did was wrong, there can’t be a state school teacher in the country who doesn’t at some level understand exactly why he did what he did.



    The GOS says: I believe every word of this article.

    I was a classroom teacher for twenty years, and I suppose I had a pretty easy ride. The schools I taught in were good, the pupils pleasant and fairly well-behaved, and I rarely had any difficulty with discipline. If I'm honest, being a man and over six feet tall helped – don't let anyone tell you it doesn't make a difference.

    I left the classroom and moved into management for a number of years, then retired. At the beginning of my retirement I received calls from two head teachers I knew. One asked me to go into his comprehensive in a seaside town and cover for an absent colleague a couple of days a week. He was desperate, so I did it for half a term until he was able to make a more permanent arrangement. It wasn't hard. The kids didn't know much, but they were cheerful and willing to have a go at anything you put in front of them, and perfectly well behaved.

    This positive experience made me confident when I received a cry for help from the second head, this time from a minor private school. Well, I thought, small classes, nice middle-class kids, I obviously haven't lost my touch, this should be a piece of cake.

    How wrong I was. They were a bunch of right little sods, frankly, and the laziest people I have ever encountered. Their determination to do as little as possible was staggering, their respect for authority miniscule, and their confidence in their own invulnerability colossal. It was only a few weeks before I decided that I'd done my bit for the youth of this country, and that a retired gentleman of advancing years should have better things to do with his time ...

    So yes, as I say ... I believe every word of this article. And let no one offend me by suggesting that it's the fault of the teachers. I won't deny that standards have fallen in recent years, but teachers are supposed to teach, not act as warders, policemen, security guards, or punchbags. For many years they have been able to rely on their own determination, aura of authority and a loud voice. If those no longer work, they have nothing to fall back on - they're allowed nothing to fall back on. And if they can't get on with their jobs, it's high time we policed the corridors with security guards. With big sticks. How's that as an opportunity for non-commissioned officers retiring from the forces?
    When in need of a drink to Refresh the soul
    Drop into the Knight & Drummer Free House.
    http://parzivalshorse.blogspot.com.au/
    Always leave a Comment as a tip.


    Cum dilectione hominum et odio vitiorum
    Love the Sinner but not the Sin.
    (St. Augustine)

    For we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against Principalities, against Powers,
    against the Rulers of the Darkness of this world, against Spiritual Wickedness in high places. “
    (and within ourselves)


    A Feminist is a human being who has lost her way and turned vicious. If you meet one on the road as you
    Go your Own Way, offer kindness but keep your sword drawn.





  15. #15
    Zuberi's Avatar
    Zuberi is offline Established Member
    Member Since
    Jul 2008
    Location
    You figure it out!!!
    Posts
    11,535

    Re: Teacher's brutal attack on boy, 13, at U.S. school posted on YouTube

    Quote Quote from Percy View Post
    I see no-one has considered this.

    While I deplore such viciousness, what DID happen up to that point?

    It is easy to make a man (boy) - woman thing of this but only if you ignore context.

    The whole school systen is falling apart.
    If the school system is falling apart, then that means the social engineers have done their job.






 
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

You may also enjoy reading the following threads, why not give them a try?

  1. Brutal Libertarian Attack Against Feminism
    By Otis the Sweaty in forum Chit chat (MAIN)
    Replies: 43
    Last Post: 25th-July-2009, 01:12 AM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 13th-October-2008, 11:30 AM
  3. Government's Brutal Attack on the Family
    By Kim in forum Chit chat (MAIN)
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 6th-October-2007, 06:21 PM
  4. Forgive me if this has been posted before.
    By ZFORCE in forum Chit chat (MAIN)
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 15th-December-2006, 06:31 PM
  5. Posted as Guest
    By Yan Yan in forum Help / Status
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 12th-May-2006, 07:11 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Donate to AntiMisandry

1e2 Forum